Prince death: Documents reveal illegal pill addiction

20 April, 2017, 08:42 | Author: Oscar Goodwin
  • Prince performs during the halftime show at the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Nearly a year after Prince died from an accidental drug overdose in his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate investigators

He said he had issued a prescription for oxycodone, an opiate, under Johnson's name to protect the star's privacy.

Court documents reveal how Prince concealed an addiction to illegally prescribed opioid painkillers before his death.

His body was found alone in the elevator of his massive estate on April 21, 2016.

Investigators are yet to determine how he obtained the synthetic opioid, which is 50 times more potent than heroin.

New court documents reveal how Prince was able to keep his use of risky opioid painkillers hidden, leading up to his accidental overdose and death a year ago.

About a week before his death, Prince's private jet made an emergency landing early April 15 in Moline, Illinois, on the way back from a performance in Atlanta.

Investigators say after learning of Prince's toxicology screening, which showed he had a lethal dose of Fentanyl in his system at the time of his death, they found no prescriptions issued under his name - but Johnson had a prescription for Oxycodone, which was prescribed by Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg.

The prescription is in the name of Prince's bodyguard, Kirk Johnson.

Prince's death scene was riddled with pills strewn around his home ... this according to search warrants just released by Minnesota authorities.

A message left with Schulenberg's attorney wasn't immediately returned. But Johnson hasn't talked to federal prosecutors, according to the official with knowledge of the investigation, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. "He flew from San Francisco, was met by Prince representatives, went to Paisley Park, and sadly Prince looked like he was experiencing a drug overdose, and (he) called 911 as a responsible person would".

Among the drugs seized were 201/2 white pills labelled "Watson 853", a mix of acetaminophen and hydrocodone, that were found in an Aleve bottle. In addition to Prince's bedroom, pills were found throughout the residence, including the laundry room, the police said.

We now know this because search warrants for his home, released by Minnesota authorities, show the Artist's drug problem was huge.

The documents also revealed that Prince did not use a cellphone, and that he had email accounts in various aliases.

Dr. Anne Pylkas, a medical addiction expert who is not connected to Prince's case, says hiding opioids in over-the-counter bottles is something she often sees. They are used to treat pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and coughs.

"Prince and his phenomenal talents led an era of music and showcased Minnesota to the world", said Governor Mark Dayton.

Investigators have said little about the case over the a year ago, other than it is active.

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