Eating cheese every day may actually be good for you

07 December, 2017, 12:27 | Author: Eloise Marshall
  • Eating Cheese Every Day May Actually Be Good for You

Cheese is undoubtedly one of our favorite foods. They found that overall, people who ate more cheese had a 14% less chance of developing heart disease and were 10% less at risk of having a stroke, compared to those who did not eat cheese at all.

Researchers from China and the Netherlands analyzed data gathered from 15 previous studies where numerous participants were tracked for at least 10 years.

A new study indicates that a little bit of cheese is good for you. More isn't necessarily better, though. But cheese also does contain high levels of saturated fat, much like other dairy products. The research relies mostly on self-reported data, which can be unreliable, and only shows a correlation - not a direct cause-and-effect. They say those who got the most benefit were eating an ounce-and-a-half a day of cheese a day, about the size of a matchbook.

Dutch and Chinese scientists examined dietary data from more than 200,000 people and came up with a surprising result. Some cheeses can be quite high and our total daily intake should be less than 1500 mg.

A meta-analysis of 15 observational studies set out to determine how long-term cheese consumption affects the development and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke. The statistics are compared to people who never or rarely ate cheese.

"This meta-analysis of prospective studies suggests a nonlinear inverse association between cheese consumption and risk of CVD."

But don't let that deter you from abstaining altogether advises Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, the Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute. One portion is 40 grams (1.4 oz), which represents a matchbox-sized chunk, two slim slices or a quarter cup of crumbled cheese, according to The Independent.

In fact, researchers cited a recent randomized controlled trial of 153 participants that ate high-fat cheese regularly for eight weeks did not increase their total cholesterol or LDL-C levels, but reduced triglycerides among subjects. Low-fat is made with 2 percent milk and non-fat is made with skim milk.

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