Published: Fri, November 09, 2018
Worldwide | By Lisa Hogan

US Midterm elections 2018: Democrats retake House, Republicans keep Senate

US Midterm elections 2018: Democrats retake House, Republicans keep Senate

The US Democrats have taken control of the House of Representatives in the mid-term elections, dealing a serious blow to President Donald Trump.

But Fox News' Decision Desk projection that Democrats will now control of the House gives hope to liberals who want to continue the Russian Federation investigation, and even introduce articles of impeachment against the president.

Early results in the USA midterm elections show Democrats inching towards majority control of the 435 member House as Republicans were clinging to delicate majorities in the Senate Tuesday night as an anxious nation watched whether voters would reward or reject the GOP in the first nationwide election of Donald Trump's turbulent presidency.

In midterm elections two years after he won the White House, Trump and his fellow Republicans expanded their majority in the US Senate following a divisive campaign marked by fierce clashes over race, immigration and other cultural issues. Democratic incumbents also prevailed in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, Midwestern states that Trump carried narrowly two years ago.

He said: "Congrats to my brother Greg Pence on being elected to serve in the US Congress".

"Tremendous success tonight. Thank you to all!" the president said on Twitter, his only remarks after projections came in.

Two hours earlier, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders had touted Trump's role in the process.

Almost 40 per cent of voters cast their ballots to express opposition to the president, according to AP VoteCast, a national survey of the electorate, while about 25 per cent said they voted to express support for Trump.

Voting in Chicago, James Gerlock, 27, a Republican, said he wanted to see more of the soaring economic growth that Trump says is the fruit of his business-friendly policies.

Republicans solidified their razor-thin Senate majority Tuesday night, knocking off several Democratic senators in traditionally red states.

Republican Ted Cruz is predicted to win against the charismatic Beto O'Rourke.

Democrats faced a far more hard challenge in the Senate, where they were nearly exclusively on defence in rural states where Mr Trump remains popular. They held onto seats in the South, Midwest and West and ensured at least a 50-50 Senate - enough to give Republicans control because Vice President Mike Pence as president of the Senate would tip the balance to the GOP.

On Tuesday, the Republicans lost their majority in the House, Congress's lower chamber, after a Democratic surge during a dramatic midterm campaign season marred by violence and hostile political rhetoric.

Forty-three-year-old steelworker Randy Graham said he has mixed feelings: He supports President Donald Trump's move to impose tariffs on some foreign steel and aluminum, but not some of the president's other steps, which he considers anti-labor.

Doubling the Democratic pain, North Dakota Senator Heidi Heitkamp crashed to defeat against Republican state lawmaker Kevin Cramer.

The editors of Sabato's Crystal BallKyle Kondik and Larry J. Sabato wrote, "We have long cautioned against assuming the House was a done deal for the Democrats, and we don't think readers should be stunned if things go haywire for Democrats tomorrow night".

Republicans paved their path to victory by defeating Democrats Joe Donnelly of IN and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota. So is Paul Ryan, the Republican speaker of the House who at times differed with the president's tone, if not his policies. Democrats believe that health care is a right for all. Fundraising reports from the third quarter of 2018 cemented those fears as Democrats outraised Republican opponents in competitive House races. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is widely expected to retain his post as the Democratic leader.

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